Introducing Hudson River Park’s River Project

We are excited to announce a new name and look for our growing environmental research, science and education initiatives – Hudson River Park’s River Project. This represents an expansion of environmental education and research in HRPK as well as the culmination of a yearlong strategic alliance between the Park and the original River Project, founded by marine scientist Cathy Drew 30+ years ago.

Last year, following the retirement of Executive Director Cathy Drew, Hudson River Park and The River Project formed a strategic alliance. With similar missions and commitments to river education and research, both organizations have since worked side-by-side to build a collective path forward. This has resulted in an expansion of the Park’s educational programming and research, to be fully operated under the new name.

A River Project wetlab guide discusses what's in the fish tanks

Hudson River Park’s River Project proudly continues to offer hands-on environmental education and conduct research with the purpose of communicating the importance of the Park’s 400-acre Estuarine Sanctuary. For our 2020 season, as parents and teachers adapt to provide online learning opportunities for students, the Park’s River Project has debuted a series of free and engaging digital programs and resources that enable families to connect to our local ecosystems, even while at home. These resources embrace the possibilities that online learning presents by providing virtual education field trips and programming centered on the Sanctuary.

Aspiring scientists of all ages can check out the STEM Activity of the Week for wildlife-inspired crafts and experiments that use common household items. Children ages 5 to 14 are also invited to participate in Hudson River Park’s first ever Virtual Summer Camp. Each week of camp, Park educators teach a dynamic live lesson focused on the River followed by a series of at-home experiments and crafts.

A boat is ready for the scientists to take water samples

Research and community science also remain major priorities of Hudson River Park’s River Project. We will keep monitoring changing water quality conditions and fish population dynamics through trap surveys and new environmental DNA methods, enriching scientific understanding of our local environment. Partnerships and community participation are both key in advancing these monitoring initiatives, and Hudson River Park’s Pier 40 Wetlab will continue to showcase native fish species, river research and scientific partnerships — an invaluable resource for our community.

We are excited to keep sharing educational programming and research from the field that showcase the transformative power of science as Hudson River Park’s River Project. Thank you for joining us as we continue to connect New Yorkers to our local environment and the Park’s Estuarine Sanctuary. Keep following our work to  experience the Hudson River as a living laboratory for community engagement, stewardship and learning!